Candy S. DeBerry, Ph.D.

Associate Professor of Biology
724-503-1001 ext: 6120
cdeberry@washjeff.edu

Office: DP 105

Degrees: Ph.D. Biological Chemistry, Program in Biochemistry, Cellular and Molecular Biology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; B.S. Zoology, University of Maryland College Park

Areas of Study

Biology

Biochemistry

Candy DeBerry is an associate professor in the Department of Biology. She is also the faculty advisor to Phi Sigma Biological Sciences honor society and member of the Biochemistry Steering Committee. She regularly teaches general biology, freshman cell biology workshop, cell biology, biochemistry, biochemistry seminar, and experimental biology. She has also co-developed and co-taught interdisciplinary courses including forensic science: from crime scene to courtoom and a course on the history of Watson and Crick's 1953 discovery of the structure of DNA.

Dr. DeBerry's primary areas of interest are the cellular basis of aging and death, cancer cell biology, signal transduction, and cytoskeleton and cell motility. She also has long-standing interests in evolutionary biology and the history and philosophy of science.

Dr. DeBerry believes that undergraduate science education should involve in-depth research experiences for all students. To this end, she actively involves students in course-based research projects and is co-organizer for the College's student projects poster session each semester. Dr. DeBerry is a member of the Internal Advisory board for W&J's HHMI grant for undergraduate science education, director of Off-campus Research Internships, and leads the steering committee for the Merck Internships for Excellence in the Sciences.

Dr. DeBerry is also passionate about ecological gardening, and her property is certified as Backyard Wildlife Habitat #48,3330 by the National Wildlife Federation and listed as a Bird Habitat by the Audobon Society of Pennsylvania. She regularly speaks to community organizations about native plants, environmentally-friendly gardening, and creating habitats for wildlife.