CEPM Research Fellows

The CEPM Research Fellows, comprised of W&J College faculty and alumni, examine issues related to energy development, production, and consumption and the resulting impacts on society at the local, regional, and national levels. In keeping with the larger liberal arts foundation of W&J, they bring a variety of perspectives to the area of energy research. The resulting practical and scholarly contributions are aimed at advancing the development of sound energy policies. In addition, their work provides W&J students an opportunity to participate in a robust research environment.

CEPM Research Fellows

Leslie Dunn, Ph.D.

Leslie Dunn, Ph.D., Washington & Jefferson CollegeLeslie Dunn is an Associate Professor of Economics at Washington & Jefferson College. After receiving a B.A. in Economics from Saint Mary’s College in 2003, she began her graduate work in Economics at West Virginia University. She received an M.A. in Economics in 2006, and, in 2008, a Ph.D. with concentrations in International Economics and Urban and Regional Economics. Her dissertation was titled “Three Essays on Development in Specialized Economies: The Resource Curse in the United States and Small Island Economies." Dr. Leslie Dunn has taught at W&J for the past six years. During this time, she has taught courses in principles and intermediate macroeconomics, international macroeconomics, international trade, economic development, and the history of economic thought. Her independent research has focused on analyzing small island economies and her joint research, with her husband, Dr. Robert Dunn, focuses on the impacts of natural resources on economic and human development. She also serves as the book review editor for The Review of Regional Studies. Drs. Leslie and Robert Dunn together developed the Washington & Jefferson College Energy Index with the aim of providing an objective, reliable, and accessible measure of the share of U.S. energy sourced domestically.

Robert Dunn, Ph.D.

Robert Dunn, Ph.D., Washington & Jefferson CollegeRobert Dunn is an Assistant Professor of Economics at Washington & Jefferson College. He received his undergraduate degree in economics from W&J in 2003, and, after enrolling in the doctoral program at West Virginia University, received his M.A. in Economics in 2007 and his Ph. D. in Economics in 2008. Dr. Robert Dunn has taught at W&J for the past six years and primarily teaches courses on microeconomics, urban and regional economics, and public finance. His independent research interests include urban economic issues and domestic population migration; his joint research, with his wife, Dr. Leslie Dunn, focuses on the impacts of natural resources on economic and human development. He also serves as the book review editor for The Review of Regional Studies. Drs. Robert and Leslie Dunn together developed the Washington & Jefferson College Energy Index with the aim of providing an objective, reliable, and accessible measure of the share of U.S. energy sourced domestically.

Yongsheng Wang, Ph.D.

Yongsheng Wang, Ph.D., Washington & Jefferson CollegeYongsheng Wang is an Associate Professor of Economics at Washington & Jefferson College. Dr. Wang received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Economics from Texas Tech University and his bachelor of management degree in Accounting from Qingdao University in China. He is the founding director of the Financial Economics program at W&J, which was recognized by the CFA (Chartered Financial Analyst) Institute’s University Recognition Program. He is a member of the U.S. Association of Energy Economics, International Association of Energy Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, Financial Executive International, and ASIANetwork. Dr. Wang serves as a trustee on the Board of the International Honor Society in Social Sciences. His prior research was funded by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) at the Department of Commerce, the ASIANetwork/Freeman Foundation, and The Heinz Endowments.

Corey Young, MCRP

Corey YoungCorey Young is a 2011 graduate of Washington & Jefferson College, where he earned his B.A. in Population and Development Studies; in 2013 he earned his Master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Clemson University. Mr. Young first became interested in energy policy in western Pennsylvania while finishing his senior year at W&J. Mr. Young pursued the topic further while writing his graduate thesis at Clemson. In that thesis, he applied concepts from behavioral economics to the arena of public finance. Specifically, he examined the relationship between the amount of revenue generated by Pennsylvania’s Act 13 and the amount of revenue saved. Other than energy policy, Mr. Young’s research interests include local economic development, particularly positive spillovers from university research parks, and transportation planning, including the design and implementation of Bus Rapid Transit systems in rural areas. In addition to working as a Research Fellow for the CEPM, Mr. Young serves as the Director of Grants and Planning for Texoma Area Paratransit System (TAPS Public Transit), a 501(c)(3) organization which provides fixed route and dial-a-ride transportation services, in North Texas. Before joining TAPS, Mr. Young worked as a planner for the City of McKinney, Texas.